Draycott in Bloom

Wilne Fires

 The 2017 theme for ‘Draycott in Bloom’ was ‘FIRE’. Remembering the disasters that occurred at St Chad’s Church on 27th March 1917 and Wilne Cotton Mills on 22nd June1917. DERBYSHIRE ADVERTISER 29th June, 1917 WILNE COTTON MILL DESTROYED ALARMING FIRE Between eight and nine o'clock on Friday night the alarming discovery was made that Wilne Cotton Mill was on fire. The premises are occupied by Messrs. Marcus Astle, Ltd., cotton doublers and finishers, and are Within a short distance of the parish church which was burnt out only a comparatively short time ago. The mill, which is a five stores building, is a very old one, and as soon as the flames were discovered as much of the stock and furniture as could be removed was taken out to a place of safety. The cause of the fire is unknown, and at the time of its outbreak only half a dozen hands were at work in the place. Both the Nottingham and Derby Fire Brigades were appealed to for assistance, but it was not forthcoming, as the scene of the conflagration was too far away. It will be remembered that upon the occasion of the tire at Wilne Church the Derby Brigade was allowed to attend, and rendered valuable aid. It so happened that the alarm was received at Derby during the sitting of the Borough Council, and as the sacred edifice was a very historical one, the members of the Council decided to break the rule for once and to allow the brigade to go. Upon the present occasion those fighting the fire had to rely upon the service of a manual engine brought from Shardlow and a small fire extinguishing apparatus kept at the mill. After the fire had been burning some hours one of the walls collapsed but fortunately no one was injured. The mill contained about 15,000 spindles, all of which were completely destroyed, together with a large quantity of cotton. The loss is estimated at some thousands of pounds, but we understand that it is covered by insurance. About 140 persons are thrown out of employment consequent upon the disaster.

Draycott and Church Wilne History Group (Summary)

Saint Chad's Church at Wilne near Draycott caught fire in the afternoon of 7th March 1917. The interior of the church was mostly destroyed. The roof was completely destroyed along with the important oak screen in the Willoughby Chapel, the main altar and its screen and the pews. In fact all of the wooden parts of the church interior were lost - the fire was very intense. It could have been worse!  By a lucky quirk of fate, the Town Council in Derby was in session that evening and immediately on being told the news, the Derby fire engine was authorized to go to the blaze: the Council allowed it to operate outside its normal area. The most important stone parts of the church were saved: the ancient font, the marble and stone figures, the tiles and decoration in the Willoughby Chapel were scorched but survived almost intact. The stained glass windows in the Willoughby Chapel were also substantially saved. The First World War was at its height - manpower was in short supply so no work to restore the Church was possible until after a great public debate and appeal, the Church restoration began in 1922. The work was completed by July 1923 at a total cost of £7,600.

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Draycott in Bloom

Wilne Fires

The 2017 theme for ‘Draycott in Bloom’ was ‘FIRE’. Remembering the disasters that occurred at St Chad’s Church on 27th March 1917 and Wilne Cotton Mills on 22nd June 1917. DERBYSHIRE ADVERTISER 29th June, 1917 WILNE COTTON MILL DESTROYED ALARMING FIRE Between eight and nine o'clock on Friday night the alarming discovery was made that Wilne Cotton Mill was on fire. The premises are occupied by Messrs. Marcus Astle, Ltd., cotton doublers and finishers, and are Within a short distance of the parish church which was burnt out only a comparatively short time ago. The mill, which is a five stores building, is a very old one, and as soon as the flames were discovered as much of the stock and furniture as could be removed was taken out to a place of safety. The cause of the fire is unknown, and at the time of its outbreak only half a dozen hands were at work in the place. Both the Nottingham and Derby Fire Brigades were appealed to for assistance, but it was not forthcoming, as the scene of the conflagration was too far away. It will be remembered that upon the occasion of the tire at Wilne Church the Derby Brigade was allowed to attend, and rendered valuable aid. It so happened that the alarm was received at Derby during the sitting of the Borough Council, and as the sacred edifice was a very historical one, the members of the Council decided to break the rule for once and to allow the brigade to go. Upon the present occasion those fighting the fire had to rely upon the service of a manual engine brought from Shardlow and a small fire extinguishing apparatus kept at the mill. After the fire had been burning some hours one of the walls collapsed but fortunately no one was injured. The mill contained about 15,000 spindles, all of which were completely destroyed, together with a large quantity of cotton. The loss is estimated at some thousands of pounds, but we understand that it is covered by insurance. About 140 persons are thrown out of employment consequent upon the disaster.
Draycott and Church Wilne History Group (Summary) Saint Chad's Church at Wilne near Draycott caught fire in the afternoon of 7th March 1917. The interior of the church was mostly destroyed. The roof was completely destroyed along with the important oak screen in the Willoughby Chapel, the main altar and its screen and the pews. In fact all of the wooden parts of the church interior were lost - the fire was very intense. It could have been worse!  By a lucky quirk of fate, the Town Council in Derby was in session that evening and immediately on being told the news, the Derby fire engine was authorized to go to the blaze: the Council allowed it to operate outside its normal area. The most important stone parts of the church were saved: the ancient font, the marble and stone figures, the tiles and decoration in the Willoughby Chapel were scorched but survived almost intact. The stained glass windows in the Willoughby Chapel were also substantially saved. The First World War was at its height - manpower was in short supply so no work to restore the Church was possible until after a great public debate and appeal, the Church restoration began in 1922. The work was completed by July 1923 at a total cost of £7,600.